One in five kids want a new phone upgrade every 18 months

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Do YOU give in to your child’s smartphone demands? More than a third of parents scrimp and save all year to meet youngsters expectations of having their handset upgraded

  • One in five children demand an upgrade from parents every eighteen months
  • A poll says 8 in 10 parents feel under pressure to get latest gadgets for kids
  • Seven in ten refused to buy brand new devices due to the ‘sky-high price tags’
  • 38 per cent opt for the refurbishments but worry their kids ‘know the difference’

One in five children demand a new phone upgrade from their parents every eighteen months, a study finds.

More than half of parents are struggling to keep up with the cost of the pricey devices, some admitting ‘going without’ themselves.

The poll in which 2,000 parents took part showed that eight in ten parents feel under pressure to make sure that their child has the latest gadgets. 

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One in five children demand a new phone upgrade from their parents every eighteen months, a study finds. More than half of parents are struggling to keep up with the cost of the pricey devices, some admitting 'going without' themselves (Stock image)

One in five children demand a new phone upgrade from their parents every eighteen months, a study finds. More than half of parents are struggling to keep up with the cost of the pricey devices, some admitting ‘going without’ themselves (Stock image)

A fifth of them reported that their child wants to upgrade their phone every eighteen months.

It also found that 37 per cent of mothers and fathers save all year to ensure that their children have the newest tech to keep up with their friends.

The research was conducted by site musicMagpie, whose spokesman Liam Howley said: ‘Technology moves at a frightening pace.

‘What was once the cutting edge of the industry can find itself next to obsolete within the space of months – and even weeks in some cases.

‘It can be hard enough even keeping up with the latest advances in technology, let alone having the cash to upgrade all your own gear.’ 

Seven in ten refused to buy brand new devices due to the sky-high price tags and 38 per cent have opted for the refurbished gadgets instead. 

Although interestingly, more than a third of parents kept the fact that the gadget wasn’t brand new and box-fresh a secret from their kids, in case they turned their noses up.

This saves an average of £110 and most parents said that their sprog ‘wouldn’t know the difference’.

It also found that 37 per cent of mothers and fathers save all year to ensure that their children have the newest tech to keep up with their friends. Parents also said that a fifth of their children want to upgrade their phone every eighteen months (Stock image)

It also found that 37 per cent of mothers and fathers save all year to ensure that their children have the newest tech to keep up with their friends. Parents also said that a fifth of their children want to upgrade their phone every eighteen months (Stock image)

The poll, conducted by OnePoll also showed that Britons expect a piece of refurbished technology to last them just under a year and a half before it needed replacing or upgrading again.

Some of the top reasons parents wouldn’t want to buy a new gadget is that it won’t be as good as in quality as the brand new one, they aren’t able to trust where it came from.

The other critique being that their children will know the difference.   

A recent study by musicMagpie showed that one in four children under the age of six has a smartphone.

More than three quarters of parents paid up to £500 for their child’s first phone with two-thirds admitting they don’t cap the monthly spend.

The research also found eight in ten parents don’t limit the amount of time children spend on their phones.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF TEENS’ SMARTPHONE HABITS?

A new web page from Apple addresses concerns parents might have about their children’s tech habits.

The page details ways to keep children from using their phones while doing homework, among other answers.

One problem highlighted in the web page is that of distracted driving.

Apple encourages parents to activate the Do Not Disturb function on their children's phones while they are on the road

Apple encourages parents to activate the Do Not Disturb function on their children’s phones while they are on the road

The page, called Families, points out that parents can ‘make teen driving safer’ by switching their children’s phones to the Do Not Disturb mode while they are on the road.

Despite campaigns informing the public about the dangers of distracted driving, cell phone usage induces thousands of car accidents each year, according to the NCBI.

According to the DMV, the leading cause of death for teenagers is texting while driving.

The Department also said the phenomenon causes at least nine deaths each day.

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