The colorful stripy socks that reveal the ancient Egyptians were more fashionable that we thought

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Scientists at the British Museum analyzed the child¿s sock

Scientists at the British Museum analyzed the child¿s sock

Scientists at the British Museum analyzed the child’s sock

Scientists at the British Museum  analyzed a child’s sock, recovered from a rubbish dump in ancient Antinoupolis in Roman Egypt, and dating from 300AD.

‘This sock was for the left foot of a child with separation between the big toe and four other toes worked in 6–7 colours of wool yarn in a single needle looping technique sometimes called nålbinding and worked from the toe upwards,’ the researchers wrote in the journal PLOS One. 

‘Each toe is made separately from dark green wool (10 rows). 

‘The two toes are then joined and worked in bands of the following colours: orange (4 rows), purple (4 rows), bluish-green (4 rows), dark red (6 rows), green (2 rows). 

‘The sole of the heel is then worked in bands of orange (3 rows), purple (3 rows), dark blue (2 rows), orange (8 rows), purple (4 rows), yellow (4 rows). 

‘A welt across the instep marks where the loops are worked in the round. The top edge is continuous and curls over; a loose thread of red wool forms part of a tie or tassel at the centre front’

Source: PLoS One 

 



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